What strategies did Rigoberta Menchu’s community develop to resist oppression?

What strategies did Rigoberta Menchu’s community develop to resist oppression?
The first step Menchu’s community developed to combat oppression from the government was to move the village chief, her father, to the center of the village. Other villages had been divided and conquered by the government because they had separated their leader from the people. The people were then unable to organize and became easy pickings. In a nearby village, the government came and took “the elected representative, the chief catechist, and their families.” In response to this event, Menchu’s village decided to come together and live on the plot of land given to her father by the government so that when soldiers came they would not be conquered so easily. The villagers immediately started to build the houses on Menchu’s families land. They started to prepare the land for houses and cut down palms to create the houses while other created the frames for the houses. The people abandoned their old customs and traditions in favor of security. No longer would they perform their traditional ceremonies before they harvested the crops or else the crops would be taken by others when it became harvestable. The children were taught to be even more discreet than ever before while signals were developed out of everyday actions to warn the people that something was about to occur. To defend themselves, the people took everyday objects and came up with ways that they could be used against the army. They also took the traps used to keep the mice and mountain animals from eating the maize and altered them to capture the army. Dogs were trained to bark at the army whenever they were in the village, no matter the time of day.

1) After reading the articles on Rigoberta Menchu and her account, what should a person make of Rigoberta Menchu’s account and why?
There should be a grain of salt taken with Menchu’s account. Many people have looked over the facts and information in her book and questioned it. With research, several have come to the conclusion that not everything is how it was written. The overall theme and story of her account should not be ignored as what she recalled happening did happen. People are just not sure now, after her facts had been checked and sifted through, if everything was true.

 

Rigoberta Menchú, “I, Rigoberta Menchú An Indian Woman in Guatemala,” 124
Rigoberta Menchú, “I, Rigoberta Menchú An Indian Woman in Guatemala,” 124

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Myles

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